Emacs PHP REPL

So, I decided to spend a little time improving my PHP skills. I’ve been building hacking wordpress templates and building plugins for a while, but I’ve been feeling like I need to improve my mastery of object-oriented development in PHP. I picked up a copy of William Sanders “Learning PHP Design Patterns” and started working through it. As I began working with the examples, I felt the urge to test concepts really quickly. Having a REPL handy is basic necessity for testing things out quickly in any language. Getting a REPL to run inside emacs makes driving your REPL of choice even faster and a great deal more pleasurable. My php repl of choice is boris, simply because I’ve got some familiarity with it. To get it to run inside emacs I installed php-boris and php-boris-minor-mode. php-boris needs the highlight library. My config ended up looking like this:

;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;
;;
;; boris
;;
;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;;

(require ‘highlight)

(add-to-list ‘load-path (expand-file-name “~/.emacs.d/lisp/php-boris”))
(require ‘php-boris)

(add-to-list ‘load-path “~/.emacs.d/lisp/php-boris-minor-mode”)

(require ‘php-boris-minor-mode)
(add-hook ‘php-mode-hook ‘php-boris-minor-mode)
(add-hook ‘web-mode-hook ‘php-boris-minor-mode)

Once all the libraries were installed, I evaluated my conf file and ran a test: I created a simple php file and passed it to boris. It worked!

Another pane opened in my emacs window, showing PHP’s evaluation of my test.

boris-repl

Putting the pieces together was easy enough. Now I can quickly test ideas from within emacs.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: